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Fall/Winter 2014
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P.O. Box 4615
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RENE HELL (Jeff Witscher)
SAT OCT 11 8pm
Graham Foundation
Madlener House
4 West Burton Place
Admission FREE: RSVP here
You say yes; Rene Hell premieres "Bifurcating a Resounding No!" The latest project from Rene née Jeff draws from years of recorded sounds (acoustic instruments, field recordings and voice), collected in cities across the U.S. and shaped with various digital techniques, to make one new weird work.
Jeff Witscher a.k.a. Rene Hell (b. 1983, Long Beach, Calif.) is a visual artist, avid chess player and music obsessive, who has explored a variety of underground styles since his teens. His aesthetic choices, expressed over dozens of recordings released under many pseudonyms, have anticipated the shifts in U.S. experimental music spanning the last decade. Most recently, he received acclaim for synth albums "Porcelain Opera" and "The Terminal Symphony" (Type), a 2012 split release with Oneohtrix Point Never, and his newest recording, "Vanilla Call Option" (PAN). Witscher's M.O. is peripatetic—roving styles, changing monikers and wide-ranging influences. Travel is central to "Vanilla Call Option" too, with its digital palette constructed on the move between airports, performance spaces and public libraries, to evoke the musique concrète of Bernard Parmegiani and computer music of Charles Dodge. Jeff Witscher lives in Los Angeles.
Presented in partnership with the Graham Foundation
ROBERT A. A. LOWE
SAT NOV 8 8pm
Graham Foundation
Madlener House
4 West Burton Place
Admission FREE; RSVP info soon
More good news from Lampo, as Robert A.A. Lowe offers a new modular synthesizer improvisation with voice, in quad sound.
Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe (b. 1975, Kansas City, Mo.) is an artist and composer working with voice in the realm of spontaneous music, often under the name of Lichens—creating patch pieces with modular synthesizer and tonal vocal work. Quality of sound through the marriage of synthesis coupled with voice has allowed for a heightened physicality in the way of ecstatic music, he says. The sensitivity of analogue modular systems echoes the organic nature of vocal expression, which in this case is meant to put forth a trancelike state, to usher in a deeper listening through sound and feeling. Collaborators include Ben Russell, Ben Rivers, Sabrina Ratté, Rose Lazar, Nicolas Becker, Tarek Atoui, Evan Calder Williams, Ariel Kalma, Lucky Dragons, Doug Aitken, Hisham Akira Bharoocha, Patrick Smith, Monica Baptista, Kevin Martin, Chris Johanson, Tyondai Braxton, David Scott Stone and Rose Kallal, as well as many others. Select performances include Doug Aitken's "Migration" happening at 303 Gallery (2008) and Princeton University (2010), "La Suite" for Serpentine Gallery (2012), "In the Wan Light of Napalm and Moon" collaboration with Evan Calder Williams (2012), "Peradam" with Sabrina Ratté at EMPAC (2014), and Cinema du Réel at the Centre Georges Pompidou (2014). He lives in Brooklyn, New York.
Presented in partnership with the Graham Foundation
LUCKY DRAGONS
SAT NOV 22 8pm
Graham Foundation
Madlener House
4 West Burton Place
Admission FREE; RSVP info soon
Los Angeles-based collaborative duo Lucky Dragons premiere "RSVP Partita," a new performance for Lampo that treats Lawrence and Anna Halprin's late 60's workshop-based approach to creative processes as a musical form—folding score, performance and evaluation together into an iterative suite for instrumentalists, software and group conversation.
A collaboration between artists Sarah Rara (b. 1983, Livingston, N.J.) and Luke Fischbeck (b. 1978, San Francisco, Calif.), Lucky Dragons have been exploring the nuances of sound as a participatory medium for close to 14 years through recordings, performance, software design, workshops, and installations. Their work has been presented in a wide variety of contexts, including the Whitney Museum of American Art (as part of the 2008 Whitney Biennial), the Centre Georges Pompidou, the Walker Art Center, London's Institute for Contemporary Art, MOMA/PS1 and the Kitchen in New York, REDCAT, LACMA and the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, MOCA Los Angeles, the 54th Venice Biennale, and the Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, among others. The name "Lucky Dragons" is borrowed from a fishing vessel caught in the fallout from H-bomb tests in the mid-1950s; an incident which sparked international outcry, spontaneously generating the worldwide anti-nuclear movement.
Presented in partnership with the Graham Foundation
TRISTAN PERICH
SAT DEC 13 8pm
Logan Center for the Arts
915 East 60th Street
Admission FREE; RSVP info soon
The great Tristan Perich returns to Lampo to present "Noise Patterns," his new composition for sequenced 1-bit patterns of white noise, programmed for and performed by microchip. The work expands on his "1-Bit Symphony" and tonal pieces for electronic circuits and acoustic instruments.
N.B. the code in "Noise Patterns" outputs random sequences of 1s and 0s. The "notes" of his "score" are then varying probabilities of randomness, ranging from the sound of white noise to sporadic, instantaneous pops, which Perich composes into rhythmic patterns. In a wave of 1-bit noise, the music is an investigation into the foundational limits of computation.
Artist and composer Tristan Perich (b. 1982, New York, N.Y.) is inspired by the aesthetic simplicity of math, physics and code. Best known for his constructions that explore the physicality of sound and the polyphonic potential of 1-bit audio, his "1-Bit Music" (2004-05) and "1-Bit Symphony" (2010) celebrate the virtuosity of electricity. Neither release is a traditional recording. Instead, each is a music-generating circuit, housed in a CD jewel case with a headphone jack. Perich also has composed several works for musicians with 1-bit music accompaniment, and is in the music group the Loud Objects (with Kunal Gupta and Katie Shima), which performs by soldering its own noise-making circuits live in front of the audience. His award winning work coupling 1-bit electronics with traditional forms in both music ("Active Field," "Observations") and visual art ("Machine Drawings," "Microtonal Wall)" has been presented around the world, from Sonar and Ars Electronica to the Whitney Museum and Museum of Modern Art. Tristan Perich first appeared at Lampo in October 2010, performing his "1-Bit Symphony."
Presented in partnership with the Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago
The Lampo series of performances is a project of Lampo, Inc., a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, nonprofit organization. Current programs are supported in part by the MacArthur Fund for Arts and Culture at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, mediaThe foundation inc., the Irving Harris Foundation, the John W. and Clara C. Higgins Foundation, and the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency. Essential contributions also come from individuals, members and volunteers.


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